about Teh Studio


Teh – the word for “tea” in Malay & Hokkien. 

Teh Studio is an interdisciplinary production space of collaboration and dialogue. 

With a particular love for craft and form, Teh celebrates a spirit of slowness and stillness, Teh hopes to explore (em)bodied processes of artmaking through immersive conversation, material art objects and communal gatherings.

about San Press


San - the word for “three” in Mandarin. 


San is a micropress that publishes zines, chapbooks, experimental print objects, and hybrid art forms three times a year.

A special project-based press, San works in experimental, material and alternative configurations of literary and visual art  
If you are into stories, inter-art projects, collaboration and experiential, affective modes of work, say hello!

reach me at tehpeople.studio@gmail.com ︎





Where have we been?


2023


Double Book Launch featuring Emily Lu & Darian Razdar - DECEMBER
Rock/Paper/Scissors Book + Print Fair - JANUARY

2022

Toronto Canzine [Toronto Reference Library] — OCTOBER





2021

Vancouver Art Book Fair [Digital] – OCTOBER
iZINElation Club: ZINE COOP Show & Tell Party [Digital] – JUNE
Toronto Canzine x TCAF [Digital] – MAY
︎Right Relations ︎

Teh Studio and San Press do not tolerate hate speech, racist, sexist, ableist and other discriminatory behaviour in our collaborations. We do not condone agendas of free speech that legitimize harmful speech and absolve the actor of consequences.

This studio press actively works toward decolonial futures, in recognition of Indigenous sovereignties on this land, in allyship with the Black community, and other communities of colour resisting White supremacy. We expect our collaborators to understand, respect, and work toward these capacities as well.

︎Situated Practice / Land Back︎

Teh Studio and San Press work in Tkaronto, Mohawk meaning “the place in the water where the trees are standing”, and Dish with One Spoon territory.
This land is also Treaty 13 and Williams Treaties territory, land calculatedly stolen and taken violently from Indigenous peoples such as the AAnishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, and Wendat, who have been stewarding and living on the land long before the arrival of colonial settlers. They are still here, and continue to lead in fighting for land back and active stewardship of Turtle Island’s lands and waters.